20091004

Kefir Cheese First Try

Now that we're raising a Kefir culture and we have a lot of kefir in the fridge, we thought we'd try to make cheese. We began with a simple congetella mozzarella recipe from Dom's Kefir Site. It took much longer than we thought to get the curd and whey to split. It also took higher temps than we would have thought. However we did make a cheese ball! It's mild, almost tasteless like a mozzarella but it's texture is not stretchy. So we dialed up a nice Italian chef in Italy on YouTube and followed his advice. We put our cheese ball into boiling water and waited to see if it would become stringy and sticky. His recipe was not kefir based so it was a gamble. It didnt work and now we're gonna try a few more experiments on the current cheese ball before beginning a new one. More as it comes. . .

4 comments:

miltonics said...

My favorite thing to do with kefir is to mix it with muesli or granola and let it sit out over night.

Kefir also makes a good sourdough bread. You just substitute it for the sourdough culture...

Starsquid said...

Considering Kefir produces CO2 and lactic acid, could it be the pH of the mixture is getting too low?

Acidic conditions make casein (the protein in milk) congeal but unlike the rennet (enzyme) congealed cheese that most of us are familiar with, it would be more like tofu in consistency- not stretchy at all.

Acid set cheese is called Paneer in India if you want to look it up.

Uni in Melbourne said...

I tried this recipe too, and found after submerging in cold , water for half an hour, it turned stringy. I also tried booking some cheeses balls (as you do to make halloumi) and the disintegrated. Definitely cold, not heat, for this recipe.

Uni in Melbourne said...

I tried this recipe, and found that soaking the cheese balls in cold water for half an hr produced the correct stringy texture. Heating them made them disintegrate for me.